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SEBAC: Prove It or Apologize

HARTFORD – Fergus Cullen, Executive Director of the Yankee Institute for Public Policy, issues the following statement in response to SEBAC’s complaint to the Attorney General:

“There are two groups of people in Connecticut: Those who enjoy the security, high pay, and generous benefits of government jobs – and the rest of us who pay for them. The unions think state employees deserve permanent jobs, automatic raises, and guaranteed health and pension benefits worth well over a million dollars per state employee. The Yankee Institute disagrees.

The union alleges that the Yankee Institute is breaking the law by opposing sweetheart labor union deals. We categorically deny all of the union’s accusations made in SEBAC’s desperate and paranoid June 17 letter to Attorney General Jepsen. If the unions can’t provide any evidence to support their charges, they should withdraw them and apologize to the Yankee Institute before their credibility is further damaged. Without such evidence, the Attorney General has no basis for an investigation and he should say so immediately.

We understand the government unions are frustrated to have as effective a critic as the Yankee Institute. But that does not excuse the union’s delusional behavior or the union’s desperate attempt to use the power of the state to silence us.

We suggest SEBAC cool off with a tall glass of lemonade and some time in the shade.”

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