Search
Back

Connecticut Overtime Spending Increases; Some Agencies Make Headway

State spending on overtime increased slightly over last year for the second quarter, according to a release from the Office of Fiscal Analysis, although some state agencies showed progress in reducing the number overtime hours for state employees.

Overtime spending was up 4 percent over this time last year, with the Department of Correction accounting for the most overtime spending, totaling $38.2 million, a $2 million increase over last year.

DOC is the largest source of overtime spending in Connecticut, but the largest increase thus far was from the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection, which includes the Connecticut State Police.

DESPP overtime spending increased $4.5 million over this time last year.

While DOC is the largest source of overtime, individual corrections officers don’t receive the highest overtime payouts, largely due to the size of the workforce which is currently over 3,000 employees.

According to a report from the Connecticut Post, State Police Troopers and employees with Connecticut’s Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services and the Department of Developmental Services receive the largest individual overtime payouts.

As reported in the Post, 97 employees in those three departments – including one employee in the Department of Children and Families – earned over $100,000 in overtime in 2018.

Overtime payments are used when calculating pensions, although the newest employee tier created in 2017 reduced the effect of overtime payments toward pensions. But most state employees are still part of retirement plans in which overtime can significantly influence pension calculations.

The Connecticut State Police have only 954 active troopers, less than the 1,248 which was mandated by state law until 2012. Fewer troopers means more overtime costs in order to fill shifts.

DMHAS, the agency that accounts for the second highest level of overtime spending year-over-year saw a slight decrease in overtime compensation.

DDS saw a $2.4 million drop in overtime as the agency moved more services and group homes to private, non-profit groups.

Overtime spending in 2018 was up 11.7 percent over the course of the year, totaling $228.1 million, according to OFA’s fourth quarter report.

Yankee Institute Statement: Gov. Lamont must bring SEBAC to the negotiating table

“In light of the horrifying projected budget deficits revealed this morning and Connecticut’s long-term structural imbalance, the only responsible course is for Gov. Lamont to seek to reopen Connecticut’s existing contract with the State Employees Bargaining Agent Coalition (SEBAC). State employee pay, healthcare, pensions and retiree healthcare costs represent a ...

Read More

Connecticut’s COVID budget deficit is $1 billion this year; next year will be much worse

Budget numbers released by the Office of Fiscal Analysis show Connecticut’s budget deficit this year grew to over $1 billion, an increase of more than $687 million over the previous estimate. Gov. Ned Lamont had said this year’s deficit would be roughly $500 million, with next year’s deficit reaching $1.5 ...

Read More

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

SIGN UP TO RECEIVE OUR NEWSLETTER